About

The Art of Sound

Pulsworks Audio Arts is all about helping people experience music in all of its beauty. With a wealth of knowledge about the way the human ear perceives and interprets sound the staff at Pulsworks can change lives. While also the owner of Pulsworks Audio Arts, Dr. David Puls is a trained musician and has been a professional sound engineer for more than thirty five years. David’s mission is to help people hear and experience music in ways they never imagined possible.

Music is an art form, recording is an art, as is the design of the system on which that music is played. It’s the cohesion of all of this mixed with passion and experience that makes your music an important part of your life, heard the way it was intended to be experienced.

We have designed sound systems for many clients, from all walks of life and with a wide variety of budgets. A love of music is simply a love of music. The key is not necessarily the brand or the price of a music system, but how well the system and its components work together to produce good sound. To build such a system, David we start out by asking important questions…

I want to know how you enjoy music. The style, the kind of music is really irrelevant, but literally how do you experience music?
What does music do for you?
What do you want it to do?

Once we figure that out, then we can design a system for you. Ultimately, a good sound system is an expression of the person and it’s our job to find out who that person is visually and sonically. As a result, systems are often described with adjectives like “awesome” and “amazing.”

Throwing together a bunch of components will certainly produce sound, but can rob you of what you should experience. It is so unfortunate that a significant part of our culture believes that iPods with MP3 files are as good as it gets—and they only produce a tiny fraction of what is possible. Poor sound systems reinforce poor sound expectation and people assume that’s all there is.

C.S. Lewis, British literature scholar mused about children growing up in the slums of London. They never ventured farther than two blocks from their home and would never know the joy of a “holiday at the sea”—they had no concept of what it means to have fun at the beach. It’s the same with us. We are far too easily pleased and we are just fine with the impoverishment of our own expectations. When people hear how music is really meant to be experienced, they’ve come to tears. They simply never knew that music could sound like this. We want to give them a “holiday at the sea.” Music as it was meant to be heard captives and transforms us—it can be life changing.

From time to time David teaches a class called The Art of Listening that helps music lovers improve their perceptive ability — it is intended for those who want to understand and appreciate music at a higher level. The ear is a passive instrument; it hears everything. The problem is that the untrained mind doesn’t know what to do with all that information so it often just chooses to ignore a significant amount of it. It is like looking at an X-ray. To most people, the film has various shades of grey. But to a trained eye—or ear, in the case of music—one can extract great detail and meaning—enjoyment.

There’s absolutely nothing wrong with simply liking music. People with minimal perceptive skills can do that just fine. But for people who improve those skills and who invest in a well designed system, it’s like they’re finally hearing music for the very first time.